Service health monitoring with Reactive Extensions

When integrating independent services to build larger systems, it’s often important for services to keep track of the status of the other services that they depend on. Especially for a microservices approach, where services should expect their dependencies can be absent at any point in time. Services that cope with dependencies being unavailable make a less flaky and more resilient, hands off system.

Services can dynamically change their behaviour as the states of their dependencies change. If a dependency is offline, a service can decide to re-route work, buffer it until processing can resume, or explicitly reject requests. Doing this proactively by reacting to changes in dependencies’ statuses makes this much more fluid.

This post will look at a simple way of using Reactive Extensions to keep track of dependency status.

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Solving GCHQ’s Christmas nonogram in 0.07 seconds

GCHQ throws down the gauntlet

A while back I found the GCHQ Director’s Christmas card, which came in the form of a nonogram. GCHQ has a history of puzzle setting and even hiring people through puzzles. The WWII codebreakers were hired through crosswords and other puzzles in the newspaper, which was featured in The Imitation Game.

I was new to nonograms, but quickly found out they’re a “paint by numbers” puzzle where hints for rows and columns give you series of segments (of varying lengths) to colour in. Applying all the clues together logically lets you work out whether each cell is filled in or empty progressively until you reach the final solution.

Typically you then have a badly pixelated picture of something and a sense of accomplishment. With GCHQ’s puzzle, you end up with a QR code that leads you to the next puzzle. So the picture is not very pretty and the sense of accomplishment is short lived. Here’s what GCHQ’s best Christmas wishes look like:


And I thought I was bad at Christmas cards.

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Identifying Market Spoofing with Data Visualizations

I love data and data visualizations. They can give deep insight into problems and behaviours, and they can make you interested in something you previously thought dull.

I came across the article “How to Catch a Spoofer” from Bloomberg, by Matthew Leising, Mira Rojanasakul and Adam Pearce. The article gives a fascinating view into the trading activity on the Chicago futures exchange, and how to identify “spoofing” within trading activity. The visualizations take a combination of a difficult concept and large volume of data, and extract genuine, novel insights.

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